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  • in reply to: Miscellaneous Questions #1723
    Rob Lucas
    Keymaster

    That happens occasionally and is nothing to worry about. Probably just someone who clicked the link accidentally, or to test it.

    -Rob

    in reply to: Creating Lecture Videos #1413
    Rob Lucas
    Keymaster

    Hi Brian,

    You can request a license for Adobe Creative Cloud software here: https://software.sites.unc.edu/software/adobe-creative-cloud/ On these forums, Matt Osment recommended Adobe Rush as a good video editor that’s fairly easy to use–although I haven’t used it personally. (Premiere Pro is available but has a steeper learning curve.) You could also try uploading the video into YouTube and using their online editor.

    -Rob

    Rob Lucas
    Keymaster

    Hi again Claire and sorry for the delay,

    Regarding course hours, I haven’t found an answer that would officially govern your class, but I found some guidelines that are used in a different part of the university, and that you could use as a rule of thumb. You should have 750 “contact minutes” per credit hour. In an online course, the contact minutes would include live class time, time spent watching pre-recorded lecture video, third-party video that students might otherwise watch during a face-to-face course meeting, interactions such as reading and writing in discussion forum, in-class group work, simualtions, peer review, and the sort of readings that would be done in class as part of an activity. Many online instructional videos are shorter but denser than face-to-face lectures, and students are expected to pause, make notes, and re-watch sections. With those, you could consider the total time students are expected to spend interacting with them.

    Out-of-class work doesn’t count toward “contact minutes.” That might include reading, studying, doing homework/problem sets, and taking tests and quizzes.

    The biggest thing is to be intentional in your decisions and be able to justify how the in-class type course work adds up to the required contact minutes. If the guidelines I’ve provided lead you to any unexpected conclusions for your class, please touch base with us again before making any major changes.

    Best,
    Rob

    Rob Lucas
    Keymaster

    Hi Claire,

    I’ve answered a couple of your questions below. I’ll need to look into the question about calculating course hours and get back to you.

    -A colleague in another department taught an online summer school course last year. Can I model my course structure on this course (i.e. no synchronous meetings; some firm deadlines, but largely self-paced)?

    Make sure you have a sense of your department’s expectations for the course, but the model you are describing is pedagogically sound and within the norm, from what I’ve seen.

    If students aren’t physically coming to class or a synchronous Zoom meeting everyday, what is an acceptable workload? Do I schedule everything as I would a normal face-to-face course that met every day or keep in mind that many choose to do the work in chunks/units/lessons?

    Usually, it’s best not to schedule every activity down to the day. Students will appreciate more flexibility than that. Could you break the content into weekly units, give a few deadlines within that (e.g., make an initial discussion forum post (or a few) by Wednesday, respond to classmates’ forum posts by Friday, and take a unit quiz by Friday), but then let students schedule their own time within that framework?

    The total workload should be roughly equivalent to a face-to-face class, but it’s also considered good practice to break up your lectures and condense them a bit, eliminating some digressions. So, your videos will cover the same core content, but they won’t be as long as the full face-to-face lecture would have been. On the other hand, students may spend more time composing a forum post than they would have spent making a comment in a f2f discussion section.

    If you’d like more help with online pedagogy, we’d be happy to schedule a consultation.

    Best,
    Rob Lucas
    Carolina Office for Online Learning

    Rob Lucas
    Keymaster

    I once worked for a company that wrote that type of question, and we often said, “Select the X that apply” because without it, students spent time thinking, “Well, this statement could arguably be correct, and that one could arguably be correct, depending what the teacher had in mind.” Including a number at least helps narrow down how many they are looking for.

    I can think of uses for all of those scoring types, but I would be wary about mixing the more exotic ones. I think students might become confused about how each question worked, and you want them to spend their mental effort on the content, not the format.

    -Rob

    Rob Lucas
    Keymaster

    Hi Ryan,

    Unfortunately, you’re not missing a setting. It just doesn’t function in quite the way you were hoping. Many instructors avoid using the point deduction feature because it adds unnecessary complications of this sort. But if you’re committed to point deductions, then I think it’s a good ideas to avoid that question type, or use the “all or nothing” grading option. In some cases, it might help to specify in the question text how many correct answers there are, like: “Select the three that apply.”

    -Rob

    Rob Lucas
    Keymaster

    Sudhanshu,

    You’re correct about test availability dates and the time limit.

    Before the student starts the test, they see a message like this:

    This assessment is due Sunday, 2020-Jan-26 12:00 PM.
    Once you click “Begin Assessment,” you will have 10 minutes or until Sunday, 2020-Jan-26 12:00 PM whichever is shorter to complete this assessment. It will be submitted at that time, regardless of whether you have answered all the questions.
    You can submit this assessment 1 time(s).

    Then, once they start, they see a timer at the top of the page, as documented here.

    -Rob

    Rob Lucas
    Keymaster

    Troy,

    Unfortunately, I don’t know of another way to give a timed assessment in Sakai. Faculty are being encouraged to lean heavily on the Honor Code right now. You could set a more generous time limit and remind students that the Honor Code is in effect. In the Settings for each assessment, you can check a box called Honor Pledge that requires students to affirm the pledge when they begin taking the assessment.

    You can also minimize the number of page transitions students will have to make by minimizing the number of Sections within the assessment. In other words, put all of the questions in a single, long section rather than multiple small sections.

    -Rob

    in reply to: Miscellaneous Questions #861
    Rob Lucas
    Keymaster

    Kimberly,

    UNC has licenses for Adobe Premiere Pro within the Adobe Creative Cloud suite, but unless you have experience with video editing, it may be more complex than you’d want right now. And you have to submit a request, so it might not be available today: https://software.sites.unc.edu/software/

    If you just need something simple, it’s probably better to use iMovie on Mac or perhaps the online video editor within YouTube Studio. You’ll probably end up posting your video on YouTube anyway (marked as unlisted), and then embedding/linking to the video from Sakai. So, using YouTube to edit would keep your workflow simple.

    -Rob

    Rob Lucas
    Keymaster

    Hi Elizabeth,

    Yes, Sakai is the primary assessment tool. Some instructors are using the Sakai Test and Quizzes tool to build assessments, especially for formats that can be graded automatically, like multiple choice. That tool can also accommodate free-response and essay type questions, but since those can’t be auto-graded, some professors are choosing just to administer those types of assessments via the uploading of Word documents. There have been some trainings/chats this week about assessment, and I imagine there will be more to come: https://keepteaching.unc.edu/training/

    Are there specific issues or types of assessments that the SOM is dealing with? I can help brainstorm or schedule a consultation.

    -Rob
    Instructional Designer
    Carolina Office for Online Learning

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)